August 1, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — Nebraska Extension is offering in-field training opportunities at three Crop Management Diagnostic Clinics in late August. They include the Soil Health Clinic Aug. 22, the Midwest Soybean Production Clinic Aug. 27, and the Midwest Corn Production Clinic Aug. 28.

The clinics feature:

  • hands-on, in-field training with CCA credits;
  • the unbiased expertise of university specialists;
  • up-to-date research-based information; and
  • one-on-one attention, on-site plot demonstrations, and beneficial interaction with other participants. The small manageable groups promote interaction between presenters and participants.

The training sessions consistently receive excellent reviews. Last year, participants estimated the value of the knowledge gained and/or anticipated practice changes would increase income by $9.16 per acre.

The clinics are held at a site specifically developed for the training at the University of Nebraska Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center (ENREC) near Mead (a short 50-minute drive from Eppley Airfield-Omaha or 35 minutes from the Lincoln Airport). The corn and soybean clinics will feature plots with crop growth and development at a range of vegetative/reproductive growth stages, allowing participants to see a whole growing season in one place.

Early registration is recommended to reserve a seat and resource materials. If registering for one clinic, the cost is $115 if registering one week in advance and $140 after.  A two-day discount is provided for those registering for both corn and soybean clinics; cost is $170 one week in advance and $220 after.

The clinics are backed by a money-back guarantee if a participant is not completely satisfied with the training.

Participants will meet at the August N. Christenson Research and Education Building at the University’s Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center near Mead.

Visit the program website for more information or to register or contact Nebraska Extension CMDC Programs, 1071 County Road G, Ithaca, NE 68033, 800-529-8030, email cdunbar2@unl.edu, or fax 402-624-8010.

  • Aug. 22 - Midwest Soil Health Clinic
    • A hands-on experience to learn more about the components of soil health
    • This outdoor training experience will be of value to home and acreage owners, farm operators, and industry consultants, said Nebraska Extension Educator Keith Glewen.  “One of our objectives of this training is to demonstrate the dynamics of the soil which includes physical, chemical and biological properties. Hopefully, this information will aid urban and rural stewards of the soil to implement practices to improve soil health.”
    • Trainers include University of Nebraska-Lincoln faculty and resource personnel from the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service. In addition to the hands-on experience, attendees will receive a resource notebook.
    • Time: 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. with registration at 8 a.m.
    • Topics:  Management considerations to improve soil health; measuring bulk density,  porosity, and infiltration and the impact on soil health; physical soil properties – the foundation for soil health; cover crops for improving soil health; what is soil biology – active carbon test; soil characteristics, productivity and landscape position; and chemical soil properties.
    • CCA Credits: 6.5 credits in soil and water management have been applied for and are pending
  • Aug. 27 – Midwest Soybean Production Clinic
    • Time: 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. with registration at 8 a.m.
    • Topics: Cultural practices; genetics/agronomics; insect management in soybeans; plant pathology; soil fertility;  IPM for successful weed management in soybean; and irrigation
    • CCA Credits:  Eight credits have been approved (2.5 – crop management; 1 – nutrition management; 1 - soil and water management; and 3.5 in pest management)
  • Aug. 28 – Midwest Corn Production Clinic
    • Time: 8:00 a.m. - 5 p.m. with registration at 7:30 a.m.
    • Topics: Cultural practices; genetics/production: How much of the yield potential can be fulfilled?; insect damage on corn; plant pathology; soil fertility; and IPM for successful weed management in corn
    • CCA Credits:  Eight credits have been approved. (1 – crop management; 2 – nutrition management; 4 – pest management, and 1 – soil and water management)

Contact:
Keith Glewen
Extension Educator
Nebraska Extension
402-624-8030
kglewen1@unl.edu

This article originally appeared on IANRnews.unl.edu: