Rob Luscher and Mark Foradori

Rob Luscher, left, and Mark Foradori lead the Prairie Art Brothers. The group will host an open mic reading at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the G.W. Frank Museum of History and Culture. Admission to the event is free.

KEARNEY — Mark Foradori decided to move the Front Porch reading series to the front porch.

“We’ve been calling these the ‘Front Porch Poetry Readings’ since we started them a couple years ago,” he said. “We decided it would be a good idea to move one of them to the front porch of the G.W. Frank Museum. The porch is designed with a break in the railing where you can put a podium and it’s designed to have speakers on it.”

The Prairie Art Brothers, an arts nonprofit group headed by Foradori and Rob Luscher, will host an open mic poetry reading at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the G.W. Frank Museum of History and Culture. Admission to the event is free. Patrons are encouraged to bring picnic dinners and lawn chairs.

Foradori invites area writers to attend the reading and contribute.

“We have some very wonderful writers from the Kearney area already scheduled to read poetry,” Foradori said. “We have Charles Peek, Lauren Bonk, Kevin Nenstiel and Brock Arehart. They will be there reading poetry. Part of using this format is encouraging people to come and read their poetry and get some feedback, if that’s what they want, from some more accomplished, more established poets.”

The Prairie Art Brothers hope to build a stronger writing community in central Nebraska.

“We want to build this community by giving people a chance to read and get feedback,” Foradori said. “Several times with our poetry readings, we have presented local people who are reading their poetry in front of a group for the first time. They always value that experience. Crossing that threshold is an important step for them.”

Readers may read their own poetry and share the work of other writers.

“You can just come up and read a poem you admire,” Foradori added. “You can practice your skills, as a reader, in front of a group. It’s a very informal setting. This reading is a way to share poetry and prose and it can be something you’ve written or something that needs to be urgently said.”

In order to allow as many readers as possible, Foradori would like to limit each reader to two selections, under 10 minutes.

“We want to give everybody an opportunity to read,” he said. “We already have five or six poets scheduled.”

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