GRAND ISLAND - New this year at Husker Harvest Days will be an expanded cattle production area that includes the introduction of seminars from high-profile industry members.

The seminars and other livestock activities at Husker Harvest Days, set for Sept. 10-12, include:

— 10 a.m., cattle handling demo (all show days).

— 11 a.m., “Fake Meat: The Real Story and What Beef Producers Need to Know,” featuring speaker Amanda Radke, author and longtime freelance contributor to Beef Magazine. Radke will have her new ranch-inspired book for kids, “Can-Do Cowkids” (Tuesday and Wednesday).

— Noon, “The Beef Business in an Era of Uncertainty,” featuring speaker Burt Rutherford, senior editor of Beef Magazine (all show days).

— 1 p.m., “Great Grazing is for Profit,” featuring speaker Alan Newport, editor of Beef Producer (all show days).

— 2 p.m., cattle handling demo (all show days).

Also scheduled are live-action equine and stock dog training demonstrations, and many cattle handling and production equipment suppliers exhibiting at the show — feed, fencing, feeding equipment, waterers, animal health supplies, security/monitoring equipment, haying equipment, buildings, wagons, trailers, welders, breed associations, purebred cattle breeders, cattle handling, horse training demonstrations, herding dog demonstrations and livestock equipment displays for livestock producers.

Cattle handling demonstrations will run at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. all three days at the Livestock Industries Building between Second and Third streets, sponsored by Enogen Feed. Ron Knodel will be demonstrating his horse training techniques using wild horses at the BLM display #50E. He will have programs daily at 10 a.m. and 1 and 3 p.m.

Herding dog demonstrations will take place on the north side of Chief Flag Road and run throughout the day.

Stock dog demonstrations at #HHD19 give visitors a chance to see dogs from the early stages of training to those with developed herding skills. Stock dog demonstrations will run daily at #HHD19 at 9 and 11 a.m. and 1 and 3 p.m., along the north side of Flag Road just outside the exhibit field.

According to Matt Jungmann, national events director for Husker Harvest Days, the field demonstrations have received “a bit of a makeover this year.”

Jungmann said combining will now begin at 10:30 a.m. The tillage demonstrations will start at 11:30 and then combining will take place again at 1 p.m.

Field demonstrations are also an integral part of Husker Harvest Days. New this year, the time for corn harvest has changed to 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. each day, giving visitors the opportunity to see the machines in action.

The haying demonstrations have been moved to north of the exhibit field. Haying demonstrations will begin at 2 p.m. with mowing, raking and baling. Also new this year, haying demonstrations will be located north of the exhibit field in Field 2.

Each company will comment on its combine, grain cart or other piece of machinery before it’s demonstrated in the field. Tillage tools and other special machines will operate each day at 11:30 a.m.

“We hope these changes allow our visitors a greater chance of catching the demonstrations they want to see,” Jungmann said.

Always a highlight at HHD is the antique farming exhibits at Husker Harvest Days. The antique displays are located on the South Shuttle Road. The displays feature dozens of antique tractors of all brands and colors. Other antique favorites will be returning, such as a small hit-and-miss engine that has been rumored to help occasionally produce homemade ice cream for visitors during the show.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.